Royal Ontario Museum Blog

Monthly Archive: December

Who sings for blues? How Blue Whales became ingredients in everyday products

Posted: June 2, 2017 - 16:38 , by Stacey Kerr
A photo of a canister of Canadian Blue Whale Brand Fertilizer - made from blue whale products in the 1950s. Photo by Katherine Ing

Living in Ontario, the Blue Whale in the vast ocean may seem a distant thought from our daily lives. But our history with these animals is more intertwined than we realize - for example, would you ever use fertilizer in your garden made from blue whales? Canadians used to! Read this guest blog post by ROM Biodiversity / Blue Whale team member Katherine Ing to find out a bit more about the other ways whale products became a part of everyday life during the peak of industrial whaling, and what that means for modern global whale conservation.

There’s more than one "cool" Drake in The Six (or in this case just outside The Six)

Posted: May 30, 2017 - 08:56 , by Antonia Guidotti
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Meet the Eastern Green Drake Mayfly (Ephemera guttulata Pictet). This beautiful adult female was collected last year in the Terra Cotta Conservation Area during the Credit River Watershed Bioblitz.

Canada 150 - Prince Edward Island - red pottery

Posted: May 25, 2017 - 12:20 , by Heather Read
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detail of ceramic bowl

One of my favorite things to think about when studying craft objects is the way in which they can teach us about the place where they were made, in both sociocultural and environmental aspects. Most often craft objects are examined from the sociocultural perspective, but the environmental perspective is important. Crafts are objects made in places, with natural resources. The story of some craft objects can teach us a great deal about the natural world and how human beings use the products of the natural world.

#ThrowbackThursday: Mending Gauze

Posted: May 25, 2017 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
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In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

Taking off Zuul’s jacket

Posted: May 19, 2017 - 15:15 , by admin
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Introducing the Zuul Preparation Blog Series: Robin Sissons is a technician at Research Casting International, as well as a scientist with an MSc from the University of Alberta on ankylosaurs. Robin will be working on preparing Zuul’s belly from its encasing rock over the next few years. Stay tuned for updates from Robin on her progress as she works on this 15 000 kg block of rock and fossil!

The Family Camera: How can I participate?

Posted: May 11, 2017 - 11:12 , by Deepali Dewan
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Black and white photo of a woman holding a camera

Submit a Photo

The photos on view in The Family Camera exhibit are selected from over 10,000 images that have been collected by The Family Camera Network as part of a public archive project.

#ThrowbackThursday: Big Labels for Old Drafts

Posted: May 11, 2017 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
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In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

Introducing Zuul, Destroyer of Shins, Generator of Science

Posted: May 10, 2017 - 15:49 , by David Evans
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Photo of a dinosaur skull

Today, the ROM unveiled a new species of armored dinosaur,

Introducing Habitat the Game to Toronto (and Canada)!

Posted: May 8, 2017 - 13:44 , by Aaron Phillips
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Polar bear characters from Habitat the Game stand next to Bull the Southern white rhino in the Schad Gallery

ROM Biodiversity is excited to announce its partnership with a mobile game for children, new to Canada, that's designed to teach kids ecologically sustainable habits.

Adventures in the Great Bear Rainforest: from the Royal Ontario Museum to the wilds of British Columbia with Paul Nicklen

Posted: May 5, 2017 - 09:11 , by Aaron Phillips
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A moss-covered, First People's-made wooden carving amidst lush-green undergrowth

Guest blog by recent EVC grad Paul Esposti relating his adventures and insights from exploring the Great Bear Sea & Rainforest.