Royal Ontario Museum Blog

Monthly Archive: December

#ThrowbackThursday: Fussy but Rewarding

Posted: June 21, 2017 - 16:25 , by Sarah Fee
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In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo 'Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

Habitat the Game Update for #Bioblitz150

Posted: June 21, 2017 - 14:19 , by Aaron Phillips
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A cartoon image of a Blanding's turtle

ROM Biodiversity is excited to announce an update to its content on Habitat the Game, celebrating the upcoming Rouge National Urban Park Bioblitz!

National Aboriginal History Month

Posted: June 15, 2017 - 14:05 , by Sarah Elliott
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an indigenous man wearing hip-hop clothing stands with his hands raised, giving instructions

By Bella McWatch, Kiowa Wind Memorial (KWM) Indigenous Youth Intern

In June, the entire country will be filled with festivities to commemorate National Aboriginal History Month. The ROM Learning Department is taking this opportunity to continue its ongoing reconciliation efforts through participation by offering Indigenous special events for school groups throughout the month.

The Past in the Present: A Dialogue

Posted: June 13, 2017 - 10:34 , by Craig Cipolla
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By Catherine Tammaro, Richard Zane Smith, and Craig Cipolla. Nearly a year ago we met together at the Royal Ontario Museum to discuss and handle Wendat pottery. Our meeting led to a small collaborative research and writing project that resulted in an ongoing series of blogs. So far, we’ve discussed Remembering Ancient Ceramic Traditions, Archaeological Approaches to Ceramics, and Wyandot Approaches to Archaeological Ceramics. In this entry, we bring our different perspectives into dialogue with one another to briefly explore the diversity and strength of collaborative projects such as ours. Here we focus specifically on our respective understandings of time, an important consideration for anyone interested in the past.

Canada 150 - Quebec - Trade beads

Posted: June 12, 2017 - 15:03 , by Heather Read
four rows of white sead beads

This week, I want to write about beads.

Museum Week 2017

Posted: June 8, 2017 - 10:46 , by Ryan Dodge
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Museum Week themes

Museum Week is back, June 19th-25th!

#ThrowbackThursday: Hanging the Curtains

Posted: June 8, 2017 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
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In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo 'Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

5 reasons to be excited for BioBlitz Canada 150 in Rouge National Urban Park

Posted: June 2, 2017 - 21:07 , by Stacey Kerr
Two young girls peer into a jar at the insect they just captured with a net during a bioblitz. Photo by David Coulson

While intensive biological surveying has taken place in the Rouge Valley before, this was before the creation of Rouge National Urban Park and a doubling in the park’s size. We are keen to make history by bringing this amazing citizen science event to Canada’s first and only national urban park for the very first time! 

Here are five reasons to be excited about Bioblitz Canada 150 in Rouge National Urban Park, written by Guest Author Omar McDadi from Parks Canada

Who sings for blues? How Blue Whales became ingredients in everyday products

Posted: June 2, 2017 - 16:38 , by Stacey Kerr
A photo of a canister of Canadian Blue Whale Brand Fertilizer - made from blue whale products in the 1950s. Photo by Katherine Ing

Living in Ontario, the Blue Whale in the vast ocean may seem a distant thought from our daily lives. But our history with these animals is more intertwined than we realize - for example, would you ever use fertilizer in your garden made from blue whales? Canadians used to! Read this guest blog post by ROM Biodiversity / Blue Whale team member Katherine Ing to find out a bit more about the other ways whale products became a part of everyday life during the peak of industrial whaling, and what that means for modern global whale conservation.

There’s more than one "cool" Drake in The Six (or in this case just outside The Six)

Posted: May 30, 2017 - 08:56 , by Antonia Guidotti
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Meet the Eastern Green Drake Mayfly (Ephemera guttulata Pictet). This beautiful adult female was collected last year in the Terra Cotta Conservation Area during the Credit River Watershed Bioblitz.