Royal Ontario Museum Blog

Monthly Archive: December

Illustrations that Bring the Past Back to Life!

Posted: February 23, 2017 - 14:35 , by Jacqueline Waters
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Meet Danielle Dufault—she is the Royal Ontario Museum's paleaontological illustrator. Check out her amazing illustrations that showcase life from the past. 

When Art Meets Fashion: COS x Agnes Martin

Posted: February 22, 2017 - 10:47 , by Alexandra Palmer
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Two male models posing against a grey background

COS × AGNES MARTIN GUGGENHEIM 2016: Martin menswear is added to the ROM collection

By Dr. Alexandra Palmer and Clara Puton

Popular Motifs on Asafo Flags from Southern Ghana

Posted: February 21, 2017 - 09:00 , by Silvia Forni
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Art, Honour, Ridicule: Asafo Flags of Southern Ghana. Unidentified artist, Saltpond Workshop c. 1980. Royal Ontario Museum.

The Fante are one of the many culturally and linguistically related groups known collectively as the Akan. They mostly live in the Central Region of Ghana, their territory extending along the coast and inland from Takoradi in the west, to Senya Beraku in the east. Coastland Fanteland, once known as the Gold Coast, has been exposed to European contact longer than any other area of sub-Saharan Africa.

#ThrowbackThursday: Typewriters and Cranky Looms

Posted: February 16, 2017 - 14:55 , by Sarah Fee
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In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

Join us at the Blue Whale Media Preview!

Posted: February 10, 2017 - 10:13 , by Ryan Dodge
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Dead Blue Whale is towed behind a boat for processing

We're inviting 10 lucky people to the Media Preview for our upcoming exhibition, Out of the Depths: The Blue Whale Story.

#ThrowbackThursday: Quite a Feat

Posted: February 2, 2017 - 15:13 , by Sarah Fee
"It looks rather hopeless but it worked."

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

Three cheers for Burgess Shale’ newest oddball animal, a worm with waving “arms”

Posted: January 30, 2017 - 20:00 , by admin
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By Jean-Bernard Caron, Senior Curator of Invertebrate Palaeontology, Royal Ontario Museum 

Sports et divertissements: a unique resource for researchers in design history

Posted: January 27, 2017 - 16:54 , by Brendan Edwards
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Portfolio cover of Sports et divertissements

Toronto based researcher, illustrator and textile artist, Ketzia Sherman, discusses the ROM Library & Archives' recent acquisition of a rare copy of Sports et divertissements, a musical score by Erik Satie with pochoir illustrations by Charles Martin, hand-coloured by Jules Saudé (Paris: Publications Lucien Vogel, [1923]).

#ThrowbackThursday: Stippling the Walls

Posted: January 19, 2017 - 12:00 , by Sarah Fee
"Frank finishing painting the weaving shed."

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

Archaeological Approaches to Ceramics

Posted: January 17, 2017 - 14:01 , by Craig Cipolla
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Huron pottery from ROM's New World Archaeology collection

Back in October, we posted the first in a series of blog entries dedicated to ROM curator, Craig Cipolla’s collaborative research project with Wyandot artists Richard Zane Smith and Catherine Tammaro entitled, “Remembering Ancient Pottery Traditions.” We encourage readers to look back and review the general goals of the project before diving into this post. In this entry we report on the specific ceramic collections that we viewed and discussed with Richard and Catherine, summarizing typical archaeological approaches to Huron ceramics.