South Asia

Monthly Archive: December Sout

Weapon Wednesday: The Indian Katar, a Necessary Dress Accessory

Posted: February 12, 2014 - 15:45 , by Robert Mason
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In South Asia during the 16th to early 20th centuries all fashionable young men when visiting their ladies would want to dress at their best. This would include one very necessary dress acessory: the katar. This uniquely South Asian dagger is thought to have developed in the very southern part of what is now India. In the 17th century the type was adopted across South Asia, and became a standard dress accessory in the Mughal courts.


Exhibit on 19th-century India Closing Soon

Posted: December 21, 2013 - 20:40 , by Deepali Dewan

Don’t miss the opportunity to see “Between Princely India and the British Raj: The Photography of Raja Deen Dayal," an original exhibit at the Royal Ontario Museum that closes in three weeks, on January 12, 2014...

A surprise photograph from India

Posted: September 20, 2012 - 15:53 , by Deepali Dewan

Mystery portrait in the ROM's collection, later revealed to be Sunder Shyam Chadha in the film “Chhottii Babhi,” 1951

Growing Collections: East Asian and South Asian Photography

Posted: February 28, 2012 - 15:36 , by Deepali Dewan

Photograph of educated man in his study by W. H. Grant, gelatin silver print, China, c. 1900. ROM 2011.79.20. Gift in memory of Rev. Dr. William Harvey Grant and Dr. Susannah McCalla Grant, M. D.

Three Questions with Cyrus Sundar Singh

Posted: July 20, 2011 - 13:35 , by Laura Comerford

Popular imagery of India is often full of bright colours that create vibrant landscapes. Taking a closer look it becomes clear that not only are India’s many forms of street art a huge source of these aesthetics, but also that they are changing. Canadian filmmaker Cyrus Sundar Singh, enchanted with the hand-painted billboards apparent on the Indian streetscape since he was a child, has made a documentary looking at where these billboards come from and what is happening to them.

Three Questions for Prashant Kadam

Posted: July 19, 2011 - 14:48 , by Laura Comerford

For a long time, bioscopes have been a part of India’s bustling landscape, an aspect of childhood that came and went as bioscopewallahs travelled through the country. Bioscopes are an early movie projector taking the form of a wooden box, the interior of which has pictures that can be viewed through four circular holes. Bioscopewallahs are the people who would make their living by them, setting up temporarily and offering them as entertainment to children.

Five Questions for Noah Cowan

Posted: July 14, 2011 - 11:00 , by Laura Comerford

Fun fact about the TIFF Bell Lightbox: its Artistic Director started out as a box-office volunteer. As a teenager, Noah Cowan volunteered for the relatively young “Festival of Festivals”, now the Toronto International Film Festival. Since those humble beginnings, he has started Midnight Madness, founded the Global Film Initiative, curated major retrospectives on Indian and Japanese cinema, started a production company, been a film critic, Co-Directed TIFF and became Artistic Director of TIFF Bell Lightbox- but not exactly in that order.