Author Archive: David Evans

Monthly Archive: December Davi

Triceratops Dig Week 2: June 20 - June 27

Posted: July 3, 2014 - 16:14 , by David Evans
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ROM Palaeo team working in the Triceratops quarry.

@ROMPalaeo Triceratops Dig Week 2: June 20-June 27

Triceratops Dig Week 1

Posted: June 23, 2014 - 10:26 , by David Evans
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Land with water on it

For the past week, a small crew from the Royal Ontario Museum’s palaeontology division has been excavating a Triceratops site on private ranchland in Harding County, South Dakota.

Southern Alberta Dinosaur Project 2012

Posted: August 14, 2012 - 08:32 , by David Evans

Tents in a grassy field with a rainbow across a grey sky.

Fig. 1. Camp after a rainstorm.

Ultimate Dinos Sneak Peek: Dinos in the Big City

Posted: April 11, 2012 - 11:32 , by David Evans

We returned from the field in Patagonia to the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires. At about 13 million people in the metro area, BA is the largest city in the country, and third largest in modern Gondwana (behind Sao Paulo and Cairo). There are dinosaurs in Buenos Aires, but only in museums, as the fossils were found in other parts of the country- mostly Patagonia. We spent one day at the Natural Science Museum, or MACN, on the edge of Palermo.

Unearthing the oldest dinosaur nesting site

Posted: January 24, 2012 - 10:11 , by David Evans

Illustration of a dinosaur nest.

Fig. 1. Reconstruction of a Massospondyus nesting site. Courtesy J. Csotonyi

Saskatchewan’s newest dinosaur has ROM connection

Posted: November 28, 2011 - 10:48 , by David Evans
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Today, Caleb Brown and colleagues announced the discovery of Canada’s newest dinosaur, Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis – the first new dinosaur species to be discovered in Saskatchewan since 1926. The new dinosaur is named after the historic District of Assiniboia, where it was found. The small-bodied, two-legged plant-eater lived alongside the famed Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops, at the very end of the age of dinosaurs.