Royal Ontario Museum Blog

Monthly Archive: December

Unfrozen in Time: From the Erebus and Terror to the ROM

Posted: November 7, 2014 - 09:09 , by Stacey Kerr
Watercolor of the grave of G.S. Malcolm A.B., who died of frostbite during the search for Franklin. Photo by Dorea Reeser

Today’s blog post is a glimpse of a tale that is largely untold. It is the story of the exploration of the Canadian Arctic, as seen by Adam White in his botanical scrapbooks. These scrapbooks were donated to the University of Toronto, and came to the ROM together with what is now the ROM’s Green Plant Herbarium. What do these scrapbooks have to do with Franklin, the HMS Erebus and the HMS Terror? It’s a fantastic story! 

Weapon Wednesday: Bagh Nakh--making humans into tigers

Posted: November 5, 2014 - 12:56 , by Deepali Dewan

Written by Aruna Panday, Ph.D Candidate York University, Co-Chair Friends of South Asia Committee, and ROM curatorial intern.

 


Bagh nakh (tiger-claw weapon), lacquered steel, India, 19th century, ROM 913.10.28


 

Franklin Found! Clues in an Arctic Mystery

Posted: November 5, 2014 - 10:30 , by Sarah Schell
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The ship 'Fox' foundered on a rock off Buchan Island

The recent discovery of one of the Franklin expedition’s lost ships has provided new evidence in a mysterious chapter in early Arctic exploration. 

What exactly is a LOT?

Posted: November 1, 2014 - 11:31 , by Nicole Richards
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Several fish in a jar

In the past 100 years, the Ichthyology section at the ROM has amassed over one million fish specimens from around the world in one of the largest fish collections in North America. These specimens are preserved, sorted into LOTS, identified, catalogued and shelved like books in a library.

Are you Afraid FOR Bats This Halloween?

Posted: October 30, 2014 - 20:53 , by Stacey Kerr
two little brown bats fly in a twilit sky over Rouge Park during the 2012 Ontario BioBlitz. Photo by Stacey Lee Kerr

I love bats. There’s just something about them that gives me that warm fuzzy feeling inside everytime I see one. Now I know what you (and to be honest, a lot of people I know) are thinking - how can she like such a creepy little mammal like a bat? Don’t they suck your blood/get caught in your hair/give you the heebie jeebies? First of all, the answer to those questions is no.

Introducing Nefret-Mut

Posted: October 24, 2014 - 09:58 , by Gayle Gibson
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Gayle Gibson with Nefret-Mut's coffin

ROM Educator and Egyptologist Gayle Gibson explains how she was able to name this mummy after so many years in the collection

Blue Whale Update: Where is it Now?

Posted: October 20, 2014 - 14:43 , by Stacey Kerr
A beached blue whale on the Newfoundland coast, strapped up and ready to be  transported to Woody Point for recovery. Photo by Jacqueline C. Waters

Guest Blog Posting by Environmental Visual Communication (EVC) student, Nila Sivatheesan

The "Maple Leaf Forever Tree" Lives On

Posted: October 17, 2014 - 14:28 , by Stacey Kerr
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Eco-Woodturner, Michael Finkelstein, works on a set of nesting bowls in his studio. Photo by Justine DiCesare

A year after a storm toppled the famous "Maple Leaf Forever Tree" in Leslieville, Toronto-based artisan and Eco-woodturner Michael Finkelstein wanted to help preserve this beautiful, 150-year old silver maple tree for future generations to enjoy through his artwork.

Walking a half-Marathon as the Herculaneum soldier

Posted: October 16, 2014 - 14:44 , by Robert Mason
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The Last Day of Pompeii is a large canvas painting by Russian artist Karl Briullov in 1830-33 (Hermitage Museum, public domain image)

Probably on October 24th in 79 AD a large group of people congregated on the beach at the seaside town of Herculaneum, in Italy. They were presumably trying to take ship to gain distance from Mount Vesuvius, which had been raining ash and rocks on the city, and the neighbouring town of Pompeii, all day. But suddenly, a massive cloud of red-hot ash swept down from the volcano directly towards Herculaneum. Studies of the skeletons on the beach show that they were mostly males, with women and children huddling in boathouses by the shore. One man in particular was a soldier.

November 8th Closure for ROM Centennial Ball

Posted: October 2, 2014 - 15:10 , by Janet Carding
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On Saturday, November 8, 2014, the ROM is hosting an important fundraising event at the Museum. The ROM Centennial Ball, co-chaired by Bonnie Brooks, Chair of the ROM Board of Trustees and Senator Nicole Eaton, will celebrate the Museum’s one hundred years with our philanthropic community and raise $700,000 (net) in important funds that will be used to support the Museum’s highest priorities.