Textiles & Fashions

Monthly Archive: December Text

#ThrowbackThursday: Needle and Thread

Posted: January 5, 2017 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
"Judy takes a crease out of a coverlet after it is hanging up."

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

#ThrowbackThursday: Saws and Drills

Posted: December 22, 2016 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
"Frank getting the blue paint on the floor of the blanket cases."

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

#ThrowbackThursday: Not a Lick of Paint

Posted: December 8, 2016 - 10:08 , by Sarah Fee
Black and white photo of a man mopping a platform

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

#ThrowbackThursday: Drying in the Garden

Posted: November 24, 2016 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
Judy drying a coverlet in the ROM garden

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

#ThrowbackThursday: Overshot Coverlets

Posted: November 10, 2016 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

#ThrowbackThursday: A Very Hot Evening

Posted: October 27, 2016 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

#ThrowbackThursday: Working Like Mad

Posted: October 13, 2016 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
Photograph of textiles behind a spinning wheel

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

#ThrowbackThursday: Keep Me Warm One Night

Posted: September 29, 2016 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
Picture of Keep Me Warm One Night installation

Exactly forty-five years ago, in September, 1971, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) opened the landmark exhibition Keep me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

Exhibit A: Dior Dress

Posted: September 15, 2016 - 08:00 , by Brittany Budani
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Red dress with white panels and black beaded designs

“In a machine age, dressmaking is one of the last refuges of the human, the personal, the inimitable.”

— Christian Dior 

Commissioned by the ROM, Passage #5 was designed by John Galliano for Christian Dior Haute Couture. This dramatic coat-dress was inspired by fashion illustrator René Gruau’s drawings from the 1940s and 1950s and is a 21st-century reworking of Dior’s 1947 New Look collection (his first).

Padded Hangers 2.0: Revamping Storage for Fitted Jackets

Posted: December 14, 2015 - 12:33 , by admin
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The ROM recently acquired 6 fitted jackets by the designer Martin Margiela. We created additional support by adding creating padded forms for the body and arms that would fit over the polyethylene wire hangers.