Royal Ontario Museum Blog

Monthly Archive: December

The Book of Life

Posted: January 16, 2017 - 21:29 , by Ryan Dodge
Categories: 
None | Comments (0) | Comment
These rock layers near Parrsboro, Nova Scotia, hold Canada’s oldest dinosaurs. They are near the boundary of two chapters of geologic time – the Triassic and Jurassic Periods of the Mesozoic Era. (Photo by Victoria Arbour)

By Dr. Victoria Arbour, ROM Postdoctoral Researcher

 

Mystery of conical fossils solved, after 175 years

Posted: January 11, 2017 - 13:57 , by admin
Categories: 
None | Comments (0) | Comment
Student holding shale slabs with fossils.

My name is Joe Moysiuk, I am a 20-year-old undergraduate student at the University of Toronto enrolled in both the departments of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and Earth Sciences. I am excited to announce that a research paper which I am lead author of, titled Hyoliths are Palaeozoic lophophorates, has recently been published by the journal Nature This paper was based primarily on newly discovered fossils housed in the ROM’s invertebrate palaeontology collections.

Science communication at the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto and the Natural History Museum, London: two experts compare notes

Posted: January 10, 2017 - 11:25 , by Aaron Phillips
Categories: 
| Comments (0) | Comment
An image of text panel in a museum, which reads: This is where the boundaries between the public galleries and behind-the-scenes science are blurred. Come in and explore.

Guest blog by recent EVC grad Temira Bruce comparing opinions from science communicators at museums in Toronto and London, UK, on the how the way in which museums communicate science to their visitors is changing.

ROM Fossils & Evolution kicks off #Fossil150!

Posted: January 5, 2017 - 14:25 , by Ryan Dodge
Categories: 
None | Comments (0) | Comment

Posted by: Marianne Mader & David Evans

 

#ThrowbackThursday: Needle and Thread

Posted: January 5, 2017 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
"Judy takes a crease out of a coverlet after it is hanging up."

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

Our Top 10 Blog posts of 2016

Posted: December 23, 2016 - 14:12 , by Ryan Dodge
Categories: 
None | Comments (0) | Comment

A look back at some of the most popular blogs of 2016

#ThrowbackThursday: Saws and Drills

Posted: December 22, 2016 - 10:00 , by Sarah Fee
"Frank getting the blue paint on the floor of the blanket cases."

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

The Ultimate Collaboration: Wildlife Photographer of the Year, the ROM and EVC

Posted: December 12, 2016 - 11:09 , by Aaron Phillips
Categories: 
| Comments (0) | Comment
A woman crouches in the woods, her camera raised to her face, ready to take a photo.

Guest blog by recent EVC grad Rhi More examining staff & student reactions to wildlife photography and the Environmental Visual Communication program.

#ThrowbackThursday: Not a Lick of Paint

Posted: December 8, 2016 - 10:08 , by Sarah Fee
Black and white photo of a man mopping a platform

In September, 1971, the ROM opened the landmark exhibition Keep Me Warm One Night, a kaleidoscopic display of over 500 pieces of Canadian handweaving. It was the culmination of decades of pioneering research and collecting by the ROM curatorial powerhouse duo ‘Burnham and Burnham’, aka Dorothy K. Burnham and Harold B. Burnham.

An Interview with Deborah Samuel on "The Extraordinary Beauty of Birds"

Posted: December 6, 2016 - 15:01 , by Stacey Kerr
A Crimson Topaz, one of the thousands of bird skins found at the ROM and feature of photographer Deborah Samuel’s new book. Photo by: Deborah Samuel

Guest blog by Environmental Visual Communication graduate David Coulson

Deborah Samuel's latest book, “The Extraordinary Beauty of Birds” is a stunning exposé of the ROM ornithology collection; an attempt, in her words, to bring these birds and feathers back to life. Here, EVC graduate David Coulson interviews Deborah about her photography and experiences working in collaboration with the ROM's Natural History collections.