Royal Ontario Museum Blog

Monthly Archive: December

Winners of the Henry's Capture the Wilderness Contest

Posted: April 27, 2016 - 09:36 , by Alyssa McLeod
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Photo of a dinosaur fossil in the museum

In conjunction with the ROM's Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, Henry's exclusively invited ROM members to enter the Capture the Wilderness Contest which ran from February 1 - March 20, 2016. ROM Members were asked to tweet their latest and greatest tips for capturing the wilderness for a chance to win one of five SONY ALPHA A6000 Cameras equipped with a 16-50mm lens! We are excited to announce the final 5 Contest Winners.

NEW RESEARCH: Seed Eating May Have Helped Beaked Birds Survive

Posted: April 20, 2016 - 14:27 , by Amanda Fruci
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Cretaceous Bird-Like Dinosaurs

Living birds may have their ancestors' beaks to thank for surviving the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs.  New research indicates the closest relatives of modern birds, the small feathered raptor dinosaurs and primitive toothed birds, went extinct abruptly at the end of the Cretaceous Period, and that beaked birds may have benefitted because of their ability to eat seeds. This study is the newest to shed light on how some animals may have survived the massive meteor impact and subsequent ecological turmoil that ended the reign of the dinosaurs.

A little piece of the puzzle – Citizen Science works!

Posted: April 16, 2016 - 11:17 , by Nicole Richards
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ROM Ornithologist, Mark Peck describes one of the ways he contributes to Citizen Science

Family Camera: Mystery Missionary

Posted: April 14, 2016 - 16:38 , by Deepali Dewan
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by Aliya Mazari, M.A. student, Photography Preservation and Collections Management, Ryerson University

National Volunteer Week 2016 | Volunteer Spotlight: Joe Moysiuk

Posted: April 11, 2016 - 17:05 , by Jaclyn Qua-Hiansen
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Man with goggles and a white helmet stands on a rocky mountaintop holding two pieces of fossilized rock. Bare trees and rocks are behind him, and a co-worker drills into a rock a few feet behind, and in the background is a range of sloping green mountains.

By: Peter Fenton

Joe Moysiuk is a volunteer in the ROM Invertebrate Palaeobiology team

National Volunteer Week 2016 | The Best Thing About ROM Camp

Posted: April 11, 2016 - 16:58 , by Jaclyn Qua-Hiansen
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Johnson, a former volunteer an now instructors, teaches his 5 year old class about the Good Mother Lizard Maiasaura.

By: Kiron Mukherjee, ROMKids Coordinator

When we receive our evaluation forms back at the end of every session of camp, our number one piece of positive feedback is not what you may think. 

National Volunteer Week 2016

Posted: April 11, 2016 - 16:51 , by Cheryl Blackman
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White text on purple background, celebrating National Volunteer Week from April 10 - 16.

Today marks the start of National Volunteer Week. The ROM is supported by a vibrant and passionate community of volunteers that contribute to making the Museum an exceptional place to visit.

Q&A with new ROM Director & CEO Josh Basseches

Posted: March 30, 2016 - 08:17 , by admin
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Portrait of Josh in the Rotunda

Yesterday we welcomed Josh Basseches, the new Director & CEO of the ROM. A transformational leader for more than two decades, Basseches brings an extraordinary depth of global museum insight to his new role. His vision includes enhancing the relevance and impact of the Museum by throwing the doors of the institution wide open and dramatically strengthening all aspects of the visitor experience. 

Five Answers to WP "Y?"

Posted: March 18, 2016 - 12:19 , by Stacey Kerr
A red fox carries the smaller body of an arctic fox in its mouth that it has hunted and killed. The 2015 winning photo by Canadian Don Gutoski of the Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest

Guest Blog written by Environmental Visual Communication student Jessica Gordon

We live in an age where almost anyone with a cell phone can take a picture and share it with everyone almost instantly. In spite of this we continue to take and fall in love with photos of nature and the wildlife that surrounds us. We continue to push the boundaries of where we can go while taking cameras along with us. The question becomes: why do we still carry on the tradition? Why is wildlife photography so important to us? Here are five answers to the question, "why?".