Royal Ontario Museum Blog

Monthly Archive: December

How Drone Photography is Saving Wildlife

Posted: March 3, 2016 - 15:41 , by Stacey Kerr
Research conducted by scientists from the NOAA Fisheries and the Vancouver Aquarium using the hexacopter to capture images of killer whales to assess their health. Photo from NOAA Fisheries.

Guest Blog written by Environmental Visual Communication student Lisa Milosavljevic

A number of photos in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Exhibit make use of aerial photography techniques, including the use of drone photography. There is also a growing demand for its use in professional and academic fields as people are recognizing how drones can be a valuable tool in their work; one of these areas is wildlife conservation. Here we are going to look at the different ways in how drone photography is saving wildlife around the world, as well as some of the controversies and questions that this developing technology raises.

#EmptyROM 3 - Hungry in the Hammer

Posted: February 29, 2016 - 12:24 , by Ryan Dodge
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Leslie from Hungry in the Hammer sent in some of her photos from our last #EmptyROM tour!

Captivating Images from Winners of the ROM Photographer of the Year Contest

Posted: February 26, 2016 - 15:55 , by Stacey Kerr
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winning photo of the ROM Wildlife Photographer of the Year Photo Contest - a coyote drinks from a stream in Toronto, photo by Steven Rose

More than 2250 photos were submitted by people from across Ontario in the 1st Annual ROM Photographer of the Year Contest, and a shot from Steven Rose of Scarborough of a coyote drinking from a stream in an undisclosed Toronto park takes home the grand prize.

#EmptyROM - Libby Roach

Posted: February 26, 2016 - 09:06 , by Ryan Dodge
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On Feb. 24th we held our 3rd #EmptyROM tour. Here are Libby's photos

Join us for the Tattoos Media Preview!

Posted: February 24, 2016 - 11:57 , by Ryan Dodge
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We're inviting 20 lucky social media savvy people to attend our Tattoos media preview on March 30th at 10 am.

ROM Research Colloquium: BLOG-A THON (Day 5)

Posted: February 22, 2016 - 08:32 , by Sascha Priewe
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An urn (HM 1953) from a collection of Zapotec artifacts; analysis suggests that this urn is a composite with ancient pieces integrated into a new object that was fabricated in the early twentieth century.

Five researchers, five questions, five days.

Join us for the ROM Research Colloquium on February 23 and meet our researchers! Stay for the Vaughan Lecture given by Dave Rudkin.

ROM Research Colloquium: BLOG-A THON (Day 4)

Posted: February 21, 2016 - 08:30 , by Sascha Priewe
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 Illustration of fossils collected in 1897 from Cambrian rocks on Mount Stephen, British Columbia

Five researchers, five questions, five days.

Join us for the ROM Research Colloquium on February 23 and meet our researchers! Stay for the Vaughan Lecture given by Dave Rudkin.

ROM Research Colloquium: BLOG-A THON (Day 3)

Posted: February 20, 2016 - 08:30 , by Sascha Priewe
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Photo of two flying moustached bats

Five researchers, five questions, five days.

Join us for the ROM Research Colloquium on February 23 and meet our researchers! Stay for the Vaughan Lecture given by Dave Rudkin.

ROM Research Colloquium: BLOG-A THON (Day 2)

Posted: February 17, 2016 - 17:25 , by Sascha Priewe
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A photo of two Amanita specimens from the Araca River, Amazonia, Brazil

Five researchers, five questions, five days.

Join us for the ROM Research Colloquium on February 23 and meet our researchers! Stay for the Vaughan Lecture given by Dave Rudkin.

ROM Research Colloquium: BLOG-A-THON (Day 1)

Posted: February 17, 2016 - 17:04 , by Sascha Priewe
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Dave Rudkin in the Raymond Quarry, 1984

Follow five of the ROM’s researchers and learn about what fascinates them, what questions are irking them and how their research helps us figure out the world.