World Cultures

Monthly Archive: December Worl

Weapon Wednesday: The Horse

Posted: January 29, 2014 - 14:42 , by Robert Mason
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Frieze from the tomb of Zuo Biao, sandstone 110cm long, dated by inscription to 150 AD, Eastern Han dynasty, Mamaozhuang village, China, # 925.25.22.N

The horse is not just a form of transportation, but is a weapon in itself. The genus Equus is thought to have evolved over 4 million years ago in North America, specialising in being able to eat the grass of the steppelands and run away from predators. North American horses later became extinct, possibly due to hunting by humans, although various species of horse, asses and zebras thrived in the Old World.

Objects and stories from Namibia

Posted: September 17, 2013 - 14:40 , by Silvia Forni

Sometimes collections grow out of chance encounters and long distance personal relationships. A couple of years ago, I was put in touch with Nharo!, a Toronto based fair trade company, by my colleague Trudy Nicks, who is a passionate explorer of the CNE international pavilion. Last year, this casual shopping connection, led to the acquisition of a large collection of Himba garments and accessories for the ROM African holdings.

Stories from 2B - Week 1: Paying attention to what's behind the curtain

Posted: June 17, 2013 - 16:32 , by Maxine Kauter
Image of door with text "2B"

What are they building in there? A weekly chronicle from communications intern, Maxine Kauter.

Faces to Remember: Chinese Portraits of the Ming and Qing Dynasties (1368 – 1911)

Posted: June 5, 2013 - 14:39 , by Gwen Adams
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Portrait of the elderly Master Jing. By an anonymous painter. Hanging scroll in ink and colour on paper. Qing dynasty, ca. 1768. The George Crofts Collection. Gift of Mrs. H.D. Warren. 921.32.98

Currently on display in the Herman Herzog Levy Gallery from May 18, 2013 to February 23, 2014 is the exhibition Faces to Remember: Chinese Portraits of the Ming and Qing Dynasties (1368 – 1911).  Located on Level 1 of the ROM’s Philosophers’ Walk building, the Levy Gallery is the Museum's main venue for its diverse slate of rotating East Asian exhibitions - themed displays drawn from the ROM’s vast collections of Chinese, Japanese and Korean artifacts.

Nature meets Culture at Archaeology Weekend!

Posted: April 10, 2013 - 16:17 , by Robert Mason
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Finial in the form of a lion's head, Syria, ivory, c. 800-600 BC, 996.86.1

Humans would have been aware of the other creatures that shared their world from earliest times. At first they would have had an eye towards possible predators or competitors, then possible prey as they became hunters.  As the cognitive ability of Early Humans developed, they would observe the nature of the animals which co-habited this Earth with them.