World Cultures

Monthly Archive: December Worl

A Model Miniature for Pompeii: The House of the Tragic Poet

Posted: June 30, 2015 - 10:07 , by Kay Sunahara
House of the Tragic Poet, Pompeii, ROM miniature model

Behind-the-Scenes at the Royal Ontario Museum's Pompeii in the Shadow of the Volcano exhibit.

A dusty old model of the House of the Tragic Poet in Pompeii is carefully deconstructed in order to craft a new touchable interactive version to be installed in the Pompeii exhibit.

Pompeii in the Shadow of the Volcano

Posted: June 17, 2015 - 16:07 , by Kay Sunahara
Wine Cup (cantharus) from the House of Menander, Pompeii

A quick collection of impressions from opening weekend festivities for the Pompeii exhibit at the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto. Exhibition runs June 13 2015 - January 3rd 2016.

Installing Pompeii

Posted: June 8, 2015 - 17:16 , by Kay Sunahara
Exhibit cases waiting for artifact install - Pompeii at the ROM

A view of behind-the-scenes preparations for a major museum exhibit on the ancient Roman city buried by a volcano in 79 AD

Exhibit in the Making: Pompeii in the Shadow of the Volcano

Posted: June 8, 2015 - 13:36 , by Kay Sunahara
Lead curator Paul Denis in the finished Pompeii exhibit

Behind-the-scenes highlights from a year of exhibit planning at the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto

Of Africa at the ROM. Exploring the complexity of African and Diasporic experience.

Posted: January 13, 2015 - 12:10 , by Silvia Forni
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The third week of October marked the launch of the three-year multi-platform project Of Africa: a rich and thought-provoking series of talks and performances entitled Histories, Collections, Reflections.

Weapon Wednesday: The Horse

Posted: January 29, 2014 - 14:42 , by Robert Mason
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Frieze from the tomb of Zuo Biao, sandstone 110cm long, dated by inscription to 150 AD, Eastern Han dynasty, Mamaozhuang village, China, # 925.25.22.N

The horse is not just a form of transportation, but is a weapon in itself. The genus Equus is thought to have evolved over 4 million years ago in North America, specialising in being able to eat the grass of the steppelands and run away from predators. North American horses later became extinct, possibly due to hunting by humans, although various species of horse, asses and zebras thrived in the Old World.

Nature meets Culture at Archaeology Weekend!

Posted: April 10, 2013 - 16:17 , by Robert Mason
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Finial in the form of a lion's head, Syria, ivory, c. 800-600 BC, 996.86.1

Humans would have been aware of the other creatures that shared their world from earliest times. At first they would have had an eye towards possible predators or competitors, then possible prey as they became hunters.  As the cognitive ability of Early Humans developed, they would observe the nature of the animals which co-habited this Earth with them.