Natural History

Monthly Archive: December Natu

Mexican Cartel lands are home to a newly described species: Goode’s Thornscrub Tortoise

Posted: February 10, 2016 - 12:00 , by Dave Ireland
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A new species of tortoise named Goode’s Thornscrub Tortoise, described today by Dr. Robert (Bob) Murphy and colleagues in the Journal ZooKeys. Photo taken in Reserva Monte Mojino, Sonora, Mexico, 24 August, 2013 Photo by Taylor Edwards

ROM curator of reptiles and amphibians, Dr. Bob Murphy and a team of international scientists use leading edge genetic techniques and dangerous fieldwork activities to describe a new species of tortoise in Mexico and shine light on the conservation status of other rare and threatened tortoises from the region

Photographer thoughts: A conversation with Mark Peck

Posted: January 26, 2016 - 17:38 , by Stacey Kerr
An adult blue jay rests on a branch in the winter season in Ontario. Photo by Mark Peck

Guest Blog written by Environmental Visual Communication student Fatima Ali

In spite of his “im-peck-able” career as an ornithology technician in the Department of Natural History at the ROM, Mark Peck is also a world traveller and an avid natural history photographer with a special interest in breeding and nesting birds. Fatima interviewed Mark to get his thoughts on what it is that drives his passion for photographing birds and other wildlife.

Beneath the Surface: Photographing at the Edge of Imagination

Posted: January 6, 2016 - 17:54 , by Stacey Kerr
“Turtle Flight” is David Doubilet’s finalist photograph in the 2015 Wildlife Photographer of the Year Exhibition at the ROM.

Guest Blog written by Environmental Visual Communication student Samantha Phillips

In search of guidance from the master of photographing moments himself, EVC student Samantha Phillips called David Doubilet and his partner Jennifer Hayes, renowned photographers whose work can often be found among the pages of National Geographic Magazine to ask them about their work. Their perspective is filled with insights and stories that Sammy was thrilled to share in this guest blog post.

Blue Whale Update: From Trenton with Love

Posted: December 22, 2015 - 11:25 , by Stacey Kerr
It took a team of seven people to lift the blue whale heart enough to finish wrapping it. Photo by Stacey Lee Kerr

It’s that time of year where many of us are pretty focused on the holidays. Spending time with family and friends, baking and eating loads of treats, and - let’s be honest - the gifts. Finding them, buying them, wrapping them, and getting them to where they need to go, whether the destination is under the Christmas tree, or to be mailed to relatives somewhere else around the world.

So, given that everybody’s in this present-logistics state of mind, we have a gift-wrapping question for you… how do you ship a blue whale heart?

WPY - The Proof is in the Picture

Posted: November 20, 2015 - 14:10 , by Stacey Kerr
“Tundra Buggy and Sun Dog” Don Gutoski’s snowy view on a photography adventure in Cape Churchill, Manitoba.

Guest Blog written by Environmental Visual Communication student Kendra Marjerrison

For some wildlife photographers, a kill shot is the ultimate goal. It creates compelling photographs that highlight moments people don’t often get to see. For others, it’s a difficult scene to witness from behind the lens. Don, the 2015 Wildlife Photographer of the Year, had no idea that the predatory behaviour captured in the photograph he took on the last day of his northern adventure would be more than just an interesting shot. It’s a powerful story about what can happen when the Earth becomes warmer and two competing predators, the red fox and the Arctic fox, are driven to cross paths...

 

Nature Stories through Photography: Insights from Connor Stefanison

Posted: November 17, 2015 - 13:33 , by Stacey Kerr
Connor Stefanison at the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Exhibition at Natural History Museum, UK

Guest Blog written by Environmental Visual Communication student Sean de Francia

Connor Stefanison is this year’s recipient of the Rising Star Portfolio Award, given to outstanding photographers 18-25 for images that will be featured at the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Exhibit. He was also awarded the Eric Hosking Portfolio Award in 2013. Here he shares his insights into producing powerful narratives through nature and wildlife photography.

BioBlitz Bits: Liking Lichen

Posted: October 15, 2015 - 14:10 , by Stacey Kerr
A type of shield lichen demonstrates the beautiful patterns of these complex organisms. Photo by Austin Miller

Guest Blog written by 2015 Environmental Visual Communication student Austin Miller and Lichenologist Dr. Troy McMullin of the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario (BIO)

Ever wondered what a lichen is? The story that is coming to light about the species diversity in and around Toronto for this unique group of organisms may surprise you.

The ROM's Very Own Batman Returns

Posted: October 13, 2015 - 14:00 , by Stacey Kerr
The ROM’s very own ‘Batman’, Assistant Curator of Mammalogy, Dr. Burton Lim with "bat wings" outlined with light in a long exposure photo. Credit: Vincent Luk

ROM Biodiversity (@ROMBiodiversity) was in the fields and forests of Sri Lanka for an intense four weeks between Aug 23 - Sept 19, 2015, completing the first comprehensive survey of bats and other small mammals that live on the island in close to 80 years. 

Hopping Their Way to Your Heart

Posted: September 29, 2015 - 15:06 , by Stacey Kerr
a toad sits patiently in the hand of a naturalist who holds it out for a young person to explore

Guest Blog written by 2015 Environmental Visual Communication student Lian Jong

Lian sat down with ROM Herpetology technician Amy Lathrop to get some insight into the museum's vast Natural History collections, in particular, its reptiles and amphibians.

Blue Whale Update: A Whole Lotta Heart

Posted: September 23, 2015 - 19:22 , by Stacey Kerr
Jacqueline Miller, Robert Henry and Paul Nader putting plugs in the major vessels of the blue whale heart. Photo by Samantha Phillips

Guest Blog written by 2015 Environmental Visual Communication student Samantha Phillips