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ROMKids Show: The One With The Winter Birds

English

Join Kiron for the ROMKids Show on Tuesday, February 9th at 2:00 pm. Tune in to Instagram Live @ROMtoronto.

This time on the ROMKids Show we learn all about birds and where they go in once the snow comes! Ornithologist Mark Peck returns to chat about how penguins live in Antarctica, why some birds go south in the winter, and how, through citizen science, we can help scientists with the Great Backyard Bird Count. Then we’ll make our own bird feeders using an orange!

MATERIALS: 

A knife is needed to cut your citrus fruit, so grab a trusted adult to help with this activity!

  • citrus fruit
  • knife
  • skewer
  • citrus press
  • bird seed
  • string

1. Grab a citrus fruit—the larger the better as it will hold more bird seed, and will allow for small birds to land on top! Large oranges and grapefruits work best.

2. Cut your citrus in half. Using your citrus press, carefully squeeze out the juice, leaving the peel of the citrus forming a bowl.

3. Using a pointy object like a skewer, poke two holes opposite of each other through the peel. Space out your holes from the top of the peel, so that you don’t accidentally break the peel!

4. Using a string, carefully tie a knot through one of the holes, and then through the other. Now you’ll be able to hang your feeder from a tree.

5. Fill your citus full of bird seed, or bird seed alternative. If you don’t have seeds, try using crumbled up nuts!

Final step.

6. Now you’re ready to hang your citrus bird feeder In your community, or backyard!

Get to Know Kiron

As the ROMKids Coordinator & Camp Director, Kiron is the public face of the Royal Ontario Museum’s family and children’s programs. Kiron started volunteering at the ROM at age 14 and has never looked back. Though he majored in history at York University, Kiron also considers his early years as a ROMKids camper to be a highly formative part of his education. Now, he strives to provide engaging and educational kids’ programming so that future generations can look back on their ROM experiences as fondly as he has. 

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Authored by: Kait Sykes

Authored by: Kait Sykes