Natural History

Monthly Archive: December Natu

Meteorite or “Meteor-wrong”?

Posted: December 16, 2011 - 13:00 , by Ian Nicklin
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ROM Earth Scientists receive dozens of requests each year to identify possible meteorites. This is especially the case when there is a spectacular fireball similar to the one which recently streaked across southern Ontario on December 12 of this year (the video was captured by astronomers at the University of Western Ontario). Do you think you have found a space rock?

Live Blogging from the Burgess Shale Virtual Museum of Canada Launch!

Posted: December 1, 2011 - 08:53 , by admin

Join us Thursday, December 1 from 11 am to noon EST as we live blog from the ROM during the launch event for the Burgess Shale Virtual Museum of Canada. This online exhibition is the most current and comprehensive resource for knowledge on one of the world’s most important fossil sites.

Overgrown Bone — A ROM Paleontologist identifies the fish with the swollen head

Posted: November 30, 2011 - 10:22 , by Kevin Seymour
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Originally published in the Summer 2010 edition of ROM Magazine.

Silver Fish

Bluecheek Silver grunt

 

Q. I found this object on a beach in Oman. I think it might be part of a fish skull. If it is, can you tell me what kind of fish it is from?
Mike Silver, Toronto

Want the answer to life, the universe and everything?

Posted: November 28, 2011 - 12:49 , by admin
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Well, at least, some serious insight into life on Earth…

Where do we come from? What was the world like long before the dinosaurs?

Saskatchewan’s newest dinosaur has ROM connection

Posted: November 28, 2011 - 10:48 , by David Evans

Today, Caleb Brown and colleagues announced the discovery of Canada’s newest dinosaur, Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis – the first new dinosaur species to be discovered in Saskatchewan since 1926. The new dinosaur is named after the historic District of Assiniboia, where it was found. The small-bodied, two-legged plant-eater lived alongside the famed Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops, at the very end of the age of dinosaurs.

Back in the lab – trying to make heads or tails of it all.

Posted: November 25, 2011 - 09:09 , by David Rudkin

After three days of successful fieldwork on the chilly Grand Rapids Uplands, we return – toting a fresh batch of fossils – to The Manitoba Museum in Winnipeg. This is the home turf of my colleague, Graham Young, and almost a second home for me.

Southern Alberta field collection 2011 has arrived!

Posted: November 18, 2011 - 12:00 , by David Evans

Fossils wrapped in plaster with labels written on the outside

Marked field jackets containing horned dinosaur bones from the McPheeter’s bonebed (MBB) and the South Side Ceratopsian (SSC).

NASA’s Continued Curiosity for Life on Mars

Posted: November 15, 2011 - 09:46 , by admin
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By Brent Hyde, Minerology Technician

Did life ever exist on the red planet? This is a question NASA has been trying to answer for more than 40 years. In the next couple of years, NASA hopes to get some answers.

On the Rocks Again — in which a pair of intrepid palaeontologists head for the hinterland.

Posted: November 7, 2011 - 11:59 , by David Rudkin

Ah, the romance of fieldwork. There’s nothing quite like waiting for the morning sun to rise high enough to illuminate a cold, wet outcrop, so that one can spend the next 8 or 9 hours kneeling in mud and splitting razor-sharp rock slabs. But we have hot coffee in the thermos, dry gloves in the pack, and — hopefully — there are some new fossils to be found!

Bugs are moving in (not bed bugs this time)

Posted: November 3, 2011 - 08:54 , by Antonia Guidotti
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Question: It’s fall, why are all these bugs coming into my home? I’ve never seen them before!

Leptoglossus occidentalis

Western conifer seed bug; copyright ROM images