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Saturday, January 27

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Exclusively for ROM Members.

The Bata Shoe Museum continues to prove that 'for every shoe there is a story'. On January 27 to 28, 2018, ROM Members are invited to receive free admission to the Bata Shoe Museum and its exhibitions, including our latest, The Gold Standard: Glittering Footwear From Around the Globe. 

11:00 am - 3:00 pm

Tours are led by trained volunteer Docents and include general museum, specific galleries and special exhibitions

Visitors interact with museum volunteers and various specimens
11:00 am - 4:00 pm

Come touch some amazing specimens, chat with staff and volunteers, and learn something new about biodiversity!

Sunday, January 28

10:30 am - 3:30 pm
Full

Please join our waiting list.

Join Neil Ever Osborne, photographer-in-residence with Canadian Geographic, for a captivating look at using conservation photography and film-making to convey the relationship between people and the planet.

10:30 am - 3:30 pm

Full

Please join our waiting list.

Gallery tours, touchables and illustrated talks will explore the stylistic elements that helped Dior revive post WWII French couture and have kept the House of Dior a fashion leader for 70 years.

Family Funday: Fossil Fest
11:00 am - 4:00 pm

Come along on a prehistoric journey millions of years in the making!

11:00 am - 3:00 pm

Tours are led by trained volunteer Docents and include general museum, specific galleries and special exhibitions

A myriad fishes inhabit the live coral reef acquarium.
11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Meet the person who keeps our coral reef aquarium thriving!

12:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Exclusively for ROM Members.

The Bata Shoe Museum continues to prove that 'for every shoe there is a story'. On January 27 to 28, 2018, ROM Members are invited to receive free admission to the Bata Shoe Museum and its exhibitions, including our latest, The Gold Standard: Glittering Footwear From Around the Globe. 

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Free. RSVP Required.
Museum admission is not included.

Anthropologist Brian Noble traces how dinosaurs and their natural worlds are recreated in the imaginations of palaeontologists, movie-goers, and children alike.