Stories

Innovative Tours

Innovative Tours

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2010s

ROM's plans to make the galleries and exhibitions accessible are accelerated with help from many people. Christine Karza, Board Member, and Cheryl Blackman, seen in the video, have championed the initiatives.

Elephants in the Basement

Elephants in the Basement

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1990s

When my son was small enough to be carried in my arms for the day, I started taking him to the museum. He soon had his favourites. We'd linger at the Nile crocodile, the Maiasaur, the little piece of forest floor in the middle of the beetles-and-butterflies room, the desert changing from day...

Eyes Wide Open

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2010s

When I first visited the ROM, I was only 7 years old, so that was 6 years ago. I was a child, so I had no idea that things from over 100 years ago, can be preserved. I remember when I saw the dinosaur exhibit.. My eyes were WIDE OPEN. The way I felt that day, was unforgettable. The whole day, I...

Full Circle

Full Circle

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1980s

Growing up without a lot of money in a small town outside of Toronto, trips to the museum were reserved for very special occasions, and I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times I actually made it through the doors. But I remember every single one of those trips with vivid clarity....

Mr. Snuffleupagus

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1970s

My friend, artist, and teacher, Margaret Ann [Clark] Fecteau told me this story. It is both funny and tragic, and took place, I think, in the late 1970s. The ROM had at that time a gallery on the archaeological periods of Ontario before European contact. Among the dioramas was one depicting the...

My Father's Home

My Father's Home

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1950s

My father, C. H. Douglas Clarke, was a naturalist who studied forestry and wildlife biology at U of T in the 30s and went on to a distinguished career as a researcher, administrator and writer in the field of wildlife management. He always told me that when he first came to U of T as an...

The Multiplicity of Possible Voices

The Multiplicity of Possible Voices

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2010s

In the opinion of Dan Rahimi, the ROM as an institution has evolved. He uses the example of a new book to illustrate what the future can bring.

A Special Place

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1930s

I've always considered the Royal Ontario Museum a "home away from home". When I was very young in the 1930's, my uncle, Eric McDougall, who was an assistant in the "stuffed animal" (as I knew it then) gallery on the third floor, would bring me there each year to watch...

Family tradition

Family tradition

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1960s

My parents had a defined set of family activities that we would do together. One of these was visiting the Royal Ontario Museum. We used to go at least annually by subway-- taking the subway was a novel experience in itself for kids who seldom left suburbia. In those days many exhibits were kept in...

Canadiana Building

Canadiana Building

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1950s

Sigmund Samuel, who has been an important donor as well as a collector in his own right, pays for a building to house the fine and decorative art and rare books that he has donated, as well as the provincial archives. This building remains as a second ROM location until very recently and shows up...