Kim Tait

Kim Tait in the field

Around dinnertime on November 20, 2008, thousands of people in central Canada witnessed a bright fireball, or shooting star, streaking across the sky. Scientists figured out where the meteorites fell, and I got out there right away to help with the search. Over four days I found 13 meteorites myself! It was an amazing experience to discover and hold a piece of outer space, something that had traveled from between Mars and Jupiter - from the asteroid belt!

Kim Tait

Job Description: 

Curator of Mineralogy

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Comment by Tim Liu

Dear Ms. Kim Tait,

Hi Kim, my name is Tim. I am writing this email to seek help on identifying an unknown rock which I bought at an antique store. I am very curious as to what type and where my rock came from. Reading from your profile, I feel you definitely have enough expertise in mineralogy and have done plenty experiments on identifying extra-terrestrial rocks/minerals. If you would be kind enough to offer any advice, I would love to arrange a meeting with you. I would appreciate if you could reply as soon as you can. Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

Tim Liu

Comment by Leslie Creel

My 4-year-old son loves the "Stones" gallery at the ROM. I greatly enjoy the exhibit as well. Awesome specimens and beautiful displays!

It would add to the experience if the interactive touch-screens had more information related to the mineral's chain of custody; location map (of course of varying detail depending on the sensitivity of the site); how it was collected, transported and stored (in situ photos if available would be awesome!); it's economic resource potential or indication thereof; special storage or cleaning requirements; even a chart on a basic igneous, metamorphic, igneous spectrum graph; schematic of it's formation environment or phases of development, Mohs...

How about a mineral ID cart with a docent like the fur, shell, critters they have in the Hands-on gallery. ("Mining Matters" might have resources for this?)

Most important for my 4-year-old, is the UV light in the phosphorescent mineral display case. When we first visited, we were greeted by a sign explaining the UV light is not working. We keep returning and the sign is gone, but the light still is not working. Any idea when that might be fixed?

Thanks for your time!