The Franklin Exploration

  • A diver from Parks Canada’s Underwater Archaeology Team works to remove kelp from the <em>Erebus</em> to better view and study the ship’s structure and artifacts.  © Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer
    A diver from Parks Canada’s Underwater Archaeology Team works to remove kelp from the Erebus to better view and study the ship’s structure and artifacts. © Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer
  • Northern Lights captured from the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Sir Wilfrid Laurier during the search for HMS Terror in 2015. © Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer
    Northern Lights captured from the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Sir Wilfrid Laurier during the search for HMS Terror in 2015. © Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer
  • The Canadian Coast Guard’s icebreaker Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the ship used to deploy the team searching for HMS Terror, steams through calm yet icy arctic waters en route to the search area. © Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer
    The Canadian Coast Guard’s icebreaker Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the ship used to deploy the team searching for HMS Terror, steams through calm yet icy arctic waters en route to the search area. © Parks Canada / Thierry Boyer

Franklin Exploration English logo
See the pop-up display in the ROM's Sigmund Samuel Gallery of Canada and nine venues across Canada. 
Ongoing.

*Breaking News: The Parks Canada Underwater Archaeology Team has confirmed the discovery of HMS Terror, the second ship of the ill-fated 1845 Franklin Expedition in search of the Northwest Passage. Continue to check-in with The Franklin Museum Network partners for updates on the discovery.

Join us as we reawaken one of the largest manhunts in Canadian history: the search for the lost ships of the Franklin Expedition, an Arctic venture that went horribly wrong 170 years ago.

The story that has inspired folk songs and travel writing for over a century began in 1845, when British explorer Sir John Franklin set forth on a much-heralded Arctic expedition in pursuit of new scientific knowledge and hoping to find the Northwest Passage. Outfitted with two ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, and a crew of 134 men, the Franklin expedition was, at the time, the best-equipped mission to venture into the Arctic waters. But three years later, Franklin, his crew, and his two ships still hadn’t returned home, prompting countless search efforts and capturing international attention.

The world’s fascination with this maritime riddle has only grown since the historic discovery of HMS Erebus in 2014, and most recently HMS Terror in 2016. Current archaeological excavation of the wreckage promises to expand our knowledge of the North, of the ocean, and of Franklin’s grisly fate.

The ROM’s new interactive pop-up display, The Franklin Exploration, is your source for learning about this incredible story as it evolves in real time. The pop-up display, which will be featured at ten venues across the country, puts the mysteries of Franklin’s tragic voyage into a historical context of science and exploration, looking at reasons behind the expedition and clues from early search efforts, and connects you to contemporary Arctic investigation, presenting the methodologies and findings of ongoing scientific research in Canada's North.

This nationwide display is the cornerstone of The Franklin Network Outreach Project, an innovative, three-year initiative helmed by the ROM, in collaboration with Parks Canada and the History Museums Network. The ROM and its partners will showcase cutting-edge technology and remarkable findings about the Franklin Expedition through special events, topical lectures, and inspired public programming.

Stay tuned for information about upcoming Franklin Exploration events.

The Franklin Network

Over the next three years, The Franklin Network Outreach Project will bring fascinating material to museums from coast to coast, sharing underwater excavations, traditional Inuit knowledge, and exciting new discoveries. During this time, some of the Franklin Network members will execute outreach work and move their pop-up displays to different locations and cities. For the latest locations across Canada, search for The Franklin Exploration by using the map below!

Gallery 

All photos copyright Parks Canada unless otherwise stated

Videos 

Finding HMS Erebus

Ship's Bell from HMS Erebus

Links 

Partners and Sponsors

Partners and Sponsor logos of the Franklin Network Outreach Project

Comments

Comment by Judy

Please tell me the dates of this exhibition. I will be in the Toronto area in early April. Will this exhibit still be on? Thank you.

Comment by dale ginsler

i would like to know the dates for this exhibit; i can't find it on the page. i have a keen interest in this history!
thanks.
dale

Comment by Lead Concierge

The Franklin exhibition is a pop up display case which rotates displays.  It is ongoing for now with no end date posted.  Please visit our website for updates.

Comment by David Faulkner

Your Franklin display is fascinating. I am visiting Toronto in July and I' m lookig forward to seeing this and your other displays in person.

Comment by Barbara Smatlanek

Greetings ... is the ranklin Exhibit permamnent. Will I still be able to view the Exhibit in October.THank you

Comment by Lead Concierge

We have and will have a pop up display at the ROM.  This is not a full exhibition and only temporary.

Comment by Lead Concierge

Great question! “The Franklin Exploration” is part of a 3 year project initiated by a joint partnership between the ROM and PCA. A network of 10 Canadian museums, including the ROM, will have access to the pop-up display during this period.