ROM Fossils & Evolution

By discovering, preserving and studying fossils from around the world, ROM palaeontologists learn how life evolved over time. The more we learn about this deep evolutionary heritage, the more we can appreciate how humans form part of the Earth’s complex fabric of life. ROM research also enables us to reconstruct past ecosystems and large-scale patterns of biodiversity through deep history. This understanding of how ancient organisms both large and small responded to biological and environmental changes contributes to our understanding of climate change and biodiversity loss today.

M.A. Fritz Travel Grant: Two awards will be offered annually to help offset the costs of visiting and studying ROM paleontology collections.

What's New

Category: Video

A study by Martin Smith of the University of Toronto and Jean-Bernard Caron of the Royal Ontario Museum sheds new light on a previously unclassifiable 500 million-year-old squid-like carnivore known as Nectocaris pteryx. The new interpretation became possible with the discovery of 91 new fossils that were collected from the Burgess Shale site in the UNESCO World Heritage Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks, BC.

Category: Video

The new Burgess Shale website launches December 1, 2011 at http://burgess-shale.rom.on.ca.

Category: Blog Post

It’s one of the most interesting jobs at the ROM – the museum artist. Working in a studio soaked in natural light, Georgia Guenther creates replicas of objects in the collection and other artistic displays you may see inside the galleries. She works closely with curators to ensure her creations are both scientifically accurate and realistic.

We stopped by the studio to ask Georgia a few questions about her role at the ROM.