ROM Biodiversity

ROM Biodiversity

Biodiversity means life.  It includes every living thing, from mosquitoes to rhinoceros to giant redwoods. Biodiversity also refers to the complex interactions among living things: it is the interconnected web of living systems, ranging from microscopic life on a single leaf of a tree to the ecosystem of a rain forest to the ecology of an immense region to the entire Planet. They are all their own systems. And they are all interconnected

ROM Biodiversity is a leading resource for understanding and conserving our natural world.

 

What's New

Category: Blog Post
Dr. Burton Lim (left) and ROM Biodiversity's Nicole Richards (right) walk along the Scarborough Bluffs waterfront en route to one of the three bat detectors. Photo by Filip Szafirowski

It’s been a hot summer, the sun is shining and the Scarborough Bluffs are standing tall above the Lake Ontario shoreline. But they might not be for long. The Scarborough Bluffs in Toronto’s east end are eroding at a rapid rate, increasing the likelihood of slope failure and damage to local species’ habitats. Although the cliffs have been eroding since the 1940s, the view from atop the Bluffs was too enticing to prevent people from further settling there.

Category: Event
A Drawing from Nature student shows off his biodiversity inspired sketch, during the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Art Show last February.

Across cultures and throughout history, the natural world has been a source of endless artistic inspiration. Visit the ROM’s Asian, Egyptian, European, Wildlife Photographer of the Year and First Peoples galleries to discover how nature features in the art of these very different cultures.

Category: Event
A group of campers meets with Danielle Dufault, palaeo illustrator at the Museum.

Delve into the world of high-tech laboratories and fascinating field research. Visit working labs, conduct your own scientific studies, and head outdoors on collecting expeditions. Get hands-on experience with the current tools and technologies used in the fields of anthropology, palaeontology, conservation biology, botany, and zoology. The sky is the limit as you consider future discoveries in these exciting fields.