Monthly Archive: December Biod

Komodo Dragon Preparation, Step Two: To the Bug Cave! I mean, Bug ROOM

Posted: December 12, 2012 - 15:31 , by Nicole Richards
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A close-up of the Komodo Dragon head before preparation of the speciman began

Viewer discretion advised. Images depict a Komodo Dragon being dissected as it is prepared for the ROM's collections. Some images may be shocking.

Biodiversity: It's in Our Nature Announcement

Posted: December 5, 2012 - 11:40 , by Wendy Vincent
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On Monday afternoon, on behalf of the ROM, Janet Carding was pleased to welcome The Honourable Michael Gravelle, Minister of Natural Resources, for the announcement of Biodiversity: It's in Our Nature, the Ontario government’s new biodiversity plan. 

A National Symposium on Our Blue Planet

Posted: November 13, 2012 - 16:24 , by Dave Ireland
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Canada's Ocean's & You

Oceans.  Canada borders three of them – we have more coastline than any country in the world, some 200,000km.  Canadian scientists study all of them – from south-east Asia to the Cape of Good Hope to our own watery borders. The ROM’s own curator Dr. Claire Healy has discovered whole orders of ocean animals, and continues to break new ground (or water) every day. Other Canadian scientists like Dr. Verena Tunnicliffe (Canada Research Chair in Deep Ocean Science) and Dr.

Curator's Corner - featuring ROM entomologist Dr. Chris Darling

Posted: October 23, 2012 - 14:25 , by Antonia Guidotti
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Dr. Chris Darling brings out some cool insects. As well, from Out of the Vaults: the Bronze Beetles of George Foster will be on display. 

Life in the ROM DNA Lab

Posted: October 3, 2012 - 12:30 , by admin
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By Oliver Haddrath, Ornithology Technician

DNA testing over the last 30 years has revolutionized many different fields ranging from health care to law enforcement to the study of human civilization and natural history.  The ROM was quick to adopt techniques such as DNA sequencing and genetic fingerprinting as powerful tools to help study its collections.

Pronghorns and Prickly Pears and Bison…oh my! Thoughts on Grasslands National Park

Posted: September 11, 2012 - 17:48 , by Nicole Richards

Submitted by Alexander Muth, winner of the Find the Baby Bison Contest

Alexander loving the view from the top of 70 mile Butte

We’re back.  We all had a great trip out west. It’s hard to pick out highlights, as it all seems like highlights to me.

Go West Young Man, and take a ROM Employee with you

Posted: September 6, 2012 - 10:47 , by Nicole Richards

I’ve just come back from Grasslands National Park with the Grand Prize Winner of the Find the Baby Bison contest, Alexander Muth. I’m the lucky ROM employee chosen to accompany him and his family on the trip (actually no luck involved at all, it was an arm wrestling competition and I’m stronger than I look).

I found the Baby Bison and now I’m on my way to Grasslands National Park

Posted: August 24, 2012 - 15:55 , by Nicole Richards

By Alexander Muth, winner of the Find the Baby Bison Contest

Alexander Muth, Family, and ROM Staff. Winner of the Find the Baby Bison Contest ceremony

Alexander with brothers Isaac and Leonard. The boys won't see this bird in Grasslands National Park but they did get to see lots of amazing things in their behind-the-scenes tour of the ROM.

Invertebrate Life in the Ocean: Curator’s Corner

Posted: August 23, 2012 - 16:53 , by Claire Healy

Hello, I’m Claire Healy, Associate Curator of Invertebrate Zoology here at the ROM. It’s almost that time again – Curator’s Corner is gearing up to bring you another opportunity to meet a curator (me!) and learn a bit more about the animals here at the museum, and the delightful organisms that I study.

Many Eyes Make Light Work: ROM Field Botany

Posted: August 22, 2012 - 16:35 , by Tim Dickinson
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Submitted by David Baxter

As student staff in the ROM Botany Section, my summer work has mostly involved sitting in a basement office updating the plant specimen database, and occasionally working with the herbarium specimens themselves. This last week, however, I’ve been in Montana and Washington searching for Crataegus (hawthorn) trees. Quite a change of pace!