Adult Programs | Lectures

What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank

SOLD OUT

FREE. RSVP Required.

Author Nathan Englander in conversation with Sara R. Horowitz, the director of the Israel and Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies.

Opening Night of Holocaust Education Week is generously co-sponsored by Zippora & Mark Orland and family, who are proud to support Holocaust Education Week in honour of Moshe & Luba Tamari.

In his recent collection of short stories, What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, Nathan Englander explores Jewish identity in the contemporary world and the perpetual shadow of the Holocaust. The title story, an allusion to Raymond Carver's What We Talk About When We Talk about Love, portrays two couples who play a morbid challenge game about who would hide them in an imagined second Shoah.

Confronting the human dualities of loyalty and betrayal, faith and fear, Englander elevates and expands our understanding of the Holocaust from the specific to the universal. And with an artful balance of humour and poignance, his writing both embraces and infuses the evolving Culture of Memory.

Englander will reflect on how collective memory of the Holocaust has influenced his writing and creative process in conversation with Sara R. Horowitz, author of Voicing the Void: Muteness and Memory in Holocaust Fiction.

Nathan Englander is the author of the story collections What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank and For the Relief of Unbearable Urges, as well as the novel The Ministry of Special Cases. He is the translator of the New American Haggadah (ed. Jonathan Safran Foer). Englander's play The Twenty-Seventh Man is currently premiering at The Public Theater. Selected as one of 20 Writers for the 21st Century by The New Yorker, Englander draws upon his orthodox Jewish upbringing in both his writing and lectures. He is the recipient of several prizes and fellowships.

Sara R. Horowitz is the Director of the Israel and Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies at York University and a professor of comparative literature, where she teaches a course entitled Imagining Anne Frank: The Girl, the Diary, the Afterlives. She is a member of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Academic Committee, the author of Voicing the Void: Muteness and Memory in Holocaust Fiction and co-editor of the journal Kerem. Horowitz most recently published The Literary Afterlives of Anne Frank, in Anne Frank Unbound: Media, Imagination, Memory (eds. Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett and Jeffrey Shandler, 2012).

Location

Royal Ontario Museum
Samuel Hall Currelly Gallery, Level 1

Contact

416.586.5797
programs@rom.on.ca